Wednesday, 15 November 2017

Further update from Irish Genealogy

I've had a brief response from Irish Genealogy (www.irishgenealogy.ie) about the problems concerning the indexes to marriage and death records, and the loss of registration district information (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/11/further-free-records-added-to-irish.html) - here goes:

Many thanks for your query

Just a few teething problems in the overlap of the updated data and the older information. Hopefully all will be sorted in the next 24 hours. Meanwhile a press release re: additional records will issue soon.


Hopefully sorted soon!

(Thanks to Irish Genealogy's feedback team)

UPDATE: Claire Santry has a further update on the situation at http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2017/11/irish-civil-bmd-records-latest-on.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Further free records added to Irish Genealogy

Thanks to Claire Santry for announcing that the Irish Government's free records site Irish Genealogy (www.irishgenealogy.ie) has been adding more records. Claire's announcement is at http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2017/11/irishgenealogyie-adds-more-free.html.

I've had a play, and whilst it is welcome that records have been added (mostly earlier marriage records from what I can see), I have also noticed something odd which I hope is a temporary glitch - namely that the registration district names appear to have disappeared from the indexes to many of the earlier marriage and death records.

To give an example... I know that my three times great grandfather Jackson Curry died in 1867 and that his death was registered in the district of Magherafelt, in Derry, in the 4th quarter of that year. When I do a search for Jackson using Magherafelt as the registration district, no results appear. When I do a search for him just by name, I then get the following:


This is the right entry - but the registration district is not noted.

I'm also getting duplication of indexes. For example, another Jackson Corry (Curry) married Eliza Jane Armstrong on 20 DEC 1878 in Newry. The record is found on Irish Genealogy, but in two different index entries, one of which has the image attached, and the other again noted without the Registration District (though the year, quarter, volume number and page number are correct):


Hopefully someone will sort it soon enough!

(With thanks to Claire)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Sunday, 12 November 2017

Scottish Witch Trial victims commemoration request

The following is from Ruth Maguire, the MSP for the Scottish constituency of Cunninghame South in North Ayrshire. On 9 NOV 2017 Ruth asked the Scottish Parliament's Minister for International Development and Europe (Dr. Alasdair Allan) the following question at General Questions in Holyrood, with reference to this being the Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology:

"To ask the Scottish Government what it is doing to mark the Scottish witch trials during the year of history, heritage and archaeology 2017?"

Thousands of women were murdered as part of the persecution of alleged witches over four centuries ago, and there have been calls from several quarters for those killed to be remembered in some way by the state. The following is part of their exchange, after Dr. Allan then confirmed there were no plans at present to do so:



The text of the full exchange is available at https://www.theyworkforyou.com/sp/?id=2017-11-09.3.0&s=archaeology.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

APG Announces New Officers, Board and Committee Members

From the Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org):

Press Release - APG Announces New Officers, Board and Committee Members
Association of Professional Genealogists Announces New Officers, Board and Committee Members:

Billie Stone Fogarty [M.Ed]M.Ed. Named President for Second Term to World's Largest Professional Organization for Genealogy

WHEAT RIDGE, Colo., 11 November 2017 - The Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) has announced the results of its election for new officers, board members, and nominating committee members. The APG membership elected four officers and six at-large board members for two-year terms (2018-2019). Two nominating committee members were elected for one-year terms. Those elected were:

Executive Committee (two-year term)

President: Billie Fogarty, MEd, is a full-time professional genealogist who has served the genealogical community in several capacities, including as APG president since 2016. She aims to continue the commitment to the important tasks initiated last term, including the launch of a new website and the implementation of the member education requirement.

Vice President: David McDonald, DMin, CG, a past APG board member, speaks nationally at conferences and institutes. As vice president, David would like to strengthen APG's place as "the premier voice for professionals in our field."

Secretary: Amy E. K. Arner, a Grahame T. Smallwood Jr. Award of Merit recipient, will continue her work as APG secretary for another term. One of Amy's goals is to increase networking opportunities within APG and the organization's educational efforts regarding good business practices.

Treasurer: Mary Kircher Roddy, CPA, is a professional genealogist, speaker, and writer who has also served as treasurer for several non-profit organizations. She looks forward to collaborating with the board to facilitate interactions among genealogists and answer their needs as professionals in the field.

Board of Directors (two-year term).

Barbara Ball, CG, based in Arizona, is continuing for another term. One of her goals is to "advocate for the genealogists...in areas where access to large archives is difficult and research opportunities can be somewhat scarce."

Valerie Elkins, having recently relocated to Colorado, is continuing for another term. She has a particular interest in "encouraging more involvement and representation for more countries, ethnic groups, and cultures."

Fiona Fitzsimons, located in Ireland, is serving another term on the board. Her core interests for APG are in outreach and education served on the Redistribution, Bylaws, and Members Survey committees.

Benjamin Hollister, from Australia, has served on the board since 2016. He envisions APG "taking a greater role in both international standards and professional development for researchers, as well as supporting members through advocacy and marketing."

Cari Taplin, CG, of Texas, a returning board member, is "committed to supporting continued growth within APG in the areas of education for professionals, improvements in our online presence, and in our work with records preservation."

Katherine R. Willson lives in Michigan. Her vision for APG is "the formation of an outreach committee to pair interested APG members with local Veterans Administration hospitals for the continued recording of lineages, histories, and narratives for all US veterans nationwide."

2018 Nominations Committee

Melanie Holtz, CG, is a Grahame T. Smallwood Jr. Award of Merit recipient based in North Carolina. She is an "advocate for professionalism within the field of genealogy, mentorship, and expanded educational offerings within the organization."

Elizabeth O'Neal of California has served on nominations committees for several organizations and feels that "board members should always be approachable and should reach out to members to learn how they can best be served." She would like to see APG "continue to embrace technology with its educational offerings and webinars, and continue to increase communication with members and chapter officers via social media channels."

"APG is fortunate to have a strong and diverse group of dedicated genealogists willing to volunteer their time to move our organization forward," said APG President, Billie Stone Fogarty. "As we welcome those returning and newly elected, we also thank those board members retiring from board service; Catherine Desmarais, CG, Sandra Ball, CPA, Sharon Atkins, Helen Daglas, Clarise Soper, CG, Christine Woodcock, and Vicki Wright."


About the Association of Professional Genealogists
The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,700 genealogists in various genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring, and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members come from all [U.S]U.S. fifty states, Canada, and forty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

(With thanks to the APG)

Chris


My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 10 November 2017

UK electoral and medical records added to Ancestry

Ancestry has been busy with a few useful additions:

UK, Absent Voter Lists, 1918-1925, 1939
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61320
Source: Absent Voter Lists taken from various Electoral Register collections.

The 1916 Representation of the People Act ruled that members of the armed forces should be listed in separate registers under the constituencies in which they normally lived. The Absent Voter Lists enabled servicemen and women to vote by proxy or by postal application, when away from home on active service. They record the civilian address of the absent voter, but more importantly they give service numbers and regimental details. Absent voter lists can be a valuable resource if you are trying to trace details of a First World War soldier. They often record the individual’s regiment, number and rank at the time, as well as his home address.

Suffolk, England, Extracted Church of England Parish Records, 1538-1850
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61545
Source: 'Electronic databases created from various publications of parish and probate records.'

Berkshire, England, Electoral Registers, 1840-1965
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61258
Source: Berkshire Electoral Registers, Berkshire Record Office, Reading, Berkshire, England.

England, Dreadnought Seamen's Hospital Admissions and Discharges, 1826-1930
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61093
Source: Dreadnought Seamen's Hospital Admission Registers, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, England.

In the early years of the nineteenth century, Zachary MacAulay and William Wilberforce established a fund for the relief of distressed seamen. The committee appointed to manage the fund met for the first time on 8 March 1821 and from this meeting was formed the Seamen's Hospital Society. The purpose of the new society was the establishment of a hospital solely for seamen. The 48 gun Grampus was loaned by the Admiralty for conversion as a hospital ship and she was moored at Greenwich in October 1821. Within the next ten years it became clear that the accommodation in the Grampus could not meet the demand and in 1831 the Admiralty agreed to replace her with a larger hulk, the Dreadnought, previously used by the Royal Navy as a hospital ship at Milford Haven.

In 1833 the hospital was incorporated by Act of Parliament as 'The Seamen's Hospital Society'. In 1832 the high incidence of cholera prompted the Central Board of Health to convert the Dover as an isolation hospital and she joined the Dreadnought at Greenwich. The Society took over the maintenance of this ship in 1835, also taking responsibility for other ships as time went on to combat outbreaks of disease. The Dreadnought in turn proved inadequate to cope with the numbers, principally merchant seamen, requiring medical treatment and in 1857 she was replaced by the 120 gun Caledonia, renamed Dreadnought by special permission of the Admiralty.

The Dreadnought hulk remained in use at Greenwich until 1872 as isolation accommodation. The Society continued to expand, opening branch hospitals and other establishments including, in 1877, the Dreadnought School for Nurses. With the advent of the National Health Service in 1948 the hospital and its branches were handed over to the Minister for Health, the Dreadnought Hospital itself surviving as a hospital for seamen, administered by the Seamen's Hospital Management Committee until 1974.

Further details via the links.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Free access to Fold3 British Commonwealth military records

Fold3 (www.fold3.com) is providing free access to its British and Commonwealth collections this weekend:

The British Commonwealth Military Collection
Explore military records outside the U.S.

A unique collection of military records

Free access until November 13th*

Australia WWI Service Records
British Army Lists
British Army WWI Service Records
Distinguished Conduct Medal Citations
Military Books
U.K. Navy Lists
British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards
Royal Hospital Chelsea Pensioner Admission & Discharge Records
Royal Hospital Chelsea Pensioner Soldier Service Record
Royal Hospital Kilmainham Pensioner Records (Ireland)
U.K. WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium, and Germany)
U.K. WWI War Diaries (Gallipoli-Dardanelles)

*Access to the records in the featured collections will start on 10 November and be free until 13 November, 2017 at 23:59 BST. To view these records you will need to register for free with Fold3.com with your email address. We will then send you a username and password to access the records. After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using an Ancestry.co.uk paid All Access membership.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 9 November 2017

Rejoining the Association of Professional Genealogists

Earlier today I took part in the first of a series of new planned CPD sessions by the Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org) Britain, Ireland and the Isles chapter, where I was interviewed alongside fellow genealogist Lorna Moloney (Merriman Research & Training Ltd) by Fiona Fitzsimons (Eneclann) about various aspects of working as a professional genealogist. Thanks to both Lorna and Fiona for what was a great session, and to those who attended and asked questions.

I was previously a member of the APG a few years ago, but did not renew my membership as back then it seemed very much US centred and focussed, and I wasn't really sure what I was getting for my money. However, with the Britain, Ireland and the Isles chapter now established and offering activities on this side of the pond, I'm delighted to say that I've finally signed up again today as a member.

Absolutely nothing about the services I currently offer will change, but readers may wish to note that APG members adhere to a Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, which you can find detailed at https://www.apgen.org/ethics/index.html

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Forces War Records discounts offers

From Forces War Records (https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk):

40% off Forces War Records Membership.

War touches many people’s lives. Is your family’s military history waiting to be discovered? Is there a war hero in your family waiting to be remembered? Did any members of your family get awarded medals for their actions in war?

Perhaps they did, but you just haven’t found out about it yet…Why not search the Forces War Records site and take a look at the wealth of records and historic documents the company holds. Let us help you start, or continue your family history quest.

Here are 5 reasons to become a full member today:

1. Get unlimited access to over 10 Million records - Over 2 million exclusive to us
2. View WW1 Troop Movements - on our exclusive interactive map
3. Get help with finding your ancestor's record from our military experts
4. Photo expert - Get help with identifying details from your photos
5. Historic Documents Archive - browse thousands of original documents

CLICK THE LINK HERE, or use the code: FBNOV17

* discount is off one year's membership, or your first month's membership.

EXPIRES - Midnight 12th Nov 2017

(With thanks to Neil White)

Chris


My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

TheGenealogist adds names from 53 new War Memorials

From The Genealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist adds another 15,000 names from 53 new War Memorials

In time for Armistice day TheGenealogist has added to their War Memorial records on the website so that there are now over 383,000 fully searchable records.

This latest release includes war memorials from Worcestershire and South Yorkshire as well as some further monuments from Australia,Canada, London and various other British counties. A more unusual one added in this release is from Olds, in Alberta, Canada - the memorial is a Sherman tank!

Fully searchable by name, researchers can read transcriptions and see images of the dedications that commemorate soldiers who have fallen in the Boer War, WW1 and various other conflicts.

These new records are available as part of the Diamond Subscription at TheGenealogist.
Read our article on War Memorials that reveal WW1 heros, The neglected Sheffield soldier finally recognised, at: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2017/war-memorials-that-reveal-ww1-heroes-681/.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Free access to Ancestry and FindmyPast military records

Both Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) and Findmypast (www.findmypast.co.uk) are offering free access to military records for the remembrance period.

From Ancestry:

FREE ACCESS STARTS FRIDAY*

Get answers to your questions about the soldiers in your family
Which of your family members served in WWI? To what regiments were they attached? Were they following in the footsteps of other military ancestors?

Answer these questions and any others you have about the soldiers in your family with four days of free access to all our UK military records starting this Friday.

* Access to the records in the featured collections will start on 10 November and be free until 13 November, 2017 at 23:59 BST. After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using an Ancestry.co.uk paid membership. To see a full list of the records in the featured collections please click here (https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/group/uk_military_collections?o_xid=82516&o_lid=82516&o_sch=Email+Campaigns).

From FindmyPast:

Your family were heroes.
Don’t let them be forgotten.
Unearth their remarkable stories in simple-to-search, original documents from the Army, Navy and RAF.
Together, we’ll keep their legacies alive.

FREE MILITARY ACCESS 8-12 NOVEMBER

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Paisley poor law records indexes online

Good news for those with connections to Paisley in Renfrewshire:

Heritage Centre makes Paisley Poor Law Indexes searchable online.

This important source of information for people researching their family history and Paisley and Renfrewshire’s social history is now much easier to search. The Heritage Centre has created an online version of the Paisley Poor Law Indexes to open up the collection to those with ancestors from this area. Find out more about these unique records, the information they contain, and how they can help you with your research on our website: https://libcat.renfrewshire.gov.uk/iguana/www.main.cls?surl=PoorLaw


From the site itself:

What area and time period do the records cover?

The records start in 1839 and run until 1942, with Parochial Boards being responsible for the administration of these records. The boards covered by our records are –
  • Paisley Parochial Board
  • Paisley Parish Council
  • Paisley Burgh
  • Abbey Parochial Board

What information is contained in a Poor Law application?

Information contained in applications for poor relief can be very useful to people researching their family history, but its depth can vary considerably. Records can include general information, such as
  • name age and place of birth
  • name of spouse and date and place of marriage
  • parents’ names and names and ages and residence of children, and if any of them are deceased
  • present address and previous addresses

They can also include detailed additional information about the family’s circumstances. Some even include birth, marriage, and death certificates, reports, wills, and newspaper cuttings.

(With thanks to Kirsty Wilkinson via Facebook)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

TNA's new cataloguing initiative, and cessation of self-service printing

The National Archives in England and the Pilgrim Trust have announced a new initiative to encourage the cataloguing of archive material. The following is the announcement:

Today The National Archives and The Pilgrim Trust announce the launch of Archives Revealed, a funding programme to support the cataloguing of archive collections. This funding will support archive services across the UK to make their uncatalogued archive collections accessible and available to all.

Archives Revealed offers two kinds of support. Cataloguing grants of up to £40,000 will be available to create catalogues of archival collections. Scoping grants of up to £3,000 will also be available to help archives to conduct collection analysis which will support the development of plans for their future cataloguing priorities and projects.

Jeff James, Chief Executive and Keeper of The National Archives said:

‘I am delighted to announce the launch of Archives Revealed. Along with The Pilgrim Trust we look forward to working with archives from across the country to support their efforts in cataloguing more of their rich and diverse collections and opening them up for all to use.’

Building on the success of a previous scheme, the National Cataloguing Grants Programme for Archives, a revised funding criteria will include an assessment of the collection’s significance, including its rarity, historical value, and research value to a variety of audience groups. This will be assessed alongside demonstrated evidence of the need for the cataloguing to be completed, with an additional focus given to an analysis of current and potential impact.

Further information on the new scheme is available at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/archives-sector/finding-funding/archives-revealed/. (The original press release is at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/archives-revealed-new-funding-programme-support-cataloguing-archive-collections/)

The National Archives has also announced that the facility will no longer provide self-service printing facilities or camera stations for users onsite. users will be able to bring cameras to the facility still, whilst digital downloads will be permitted which can be emailed home free of charge. For further details on this visit the archive's announcement at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/changes-to-self-service-copying-facilities-from-11-december-2017/.

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Saturday, 4 November 2017

Ancestry enables privacy setting for DNA results

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has enabled a new option to make a person's DNA results private or public. Here's the announcement:

One of the powerful benefits of using AncestryDNA is discovering DNA Matches, potential relatives who share DNA with you. Thanks to more than 6 million people providing a little saliva, we are helping customers around the world discover new relatives and reunite with family every day. As more people take the AncestryDNA test, there are new possibilities for a discovery all the time.

We understand the power of discovery for our customers, and look for ways to improve our services to make it easier to find new connections and explore what they may mean for your family history. We also understand the critical importance of privacy and enabling our customers’ control over their own data, which is why we strive to enhance user control in our services. Today, in that spirit of continually providing customers greater control and choice, we are introducing the ability to choose of whether or not to view and be viewed by their DNA matches.

Customers can now decide if they want to have access to the list of people they may be related to and be shown as a potential family member for other customers with whom they share DNA. While connecting family is one of the main benefits of our service, we also recognize that not everyone is open to discovering their extended family.

For existing customers, if you want to continue to see and be seen by your DNA matches, you don’t need to do anything. You still have access to your DNA Match list and you will still show up as a potential match to others and can change your preference on your DNA Settings page. If you change the setting to “no” you will no longer have access to your DNA Matches and no longer be shown as a DNA Match for others. You can change your mind at any time by going to the DNA Settings page.

We have heard from many of our customers that they quickly find one of the best ongoing benefits of our service is the opportunity to discover new family connections and seeing how connected you are to others around the world. We will continue to invest in this capability and emphasize it as a reason to use our service. As the largest consumer DNA database, by far – close to three times the size of the next largest – we want to always provide the best opportunity to find new potential family members.

COMMENT: It is completely right that users have a say on how their results can be viewed. However, it is worth pointing out that if a user does not wish to share their DNA results, there is very little point in doing such a test in the first place. The whole point of DNA testing from a family history point of view is to use it as a tool to help establish connections. Without this, you are simply left with an ethnicity profile.

(With thanks to Dick Eastman via https://blog.eogn.com/2017/11/03/ancestry-adds-options-to-share-or-to-not-share-dna-information/ - Ancestry's original announcement is at https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2017/11/02/continued-commitment-to-customer-privacy-and-control/, with comments below)  

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 3 November 2017

The Poetry of Wartime Evacuation project needs votes for funding

Gillian Mawson is seeking support to raise funds from the Aviva Community Fund towards the Poetry of Wartime Evacuation: Community Archive for Channel Island Evacuation project.

Here's a description of the project aims:

The Aviva funding awarded to us in 2015 has now expired. We wish to hold regular group meetings again, to create a booklet containing Wartime Poetry written by Evacuees, which can be given to local libraries and schools. Our group has been collecting these emotional poems since 2015. They have been written by evacuees from all over Britain and the Channel Islands. Each poem would be accompanied by a wartime image from our collection. The importance of such poetry has not, so far, been widely shared in the Stockport community. It includes themes such as Leaving Home, The evacuation journey, the air raids which occurred in their new 'supposedly safe' homes, Thoughts of Home, The Kindness of communities towards Evacuees, Thoughts of those fighting in the British Forces, Victory in Europe and the end of the war, The Return Home and the sadness of leaving behind their loving 'foster parents'

To complete this project before the end of 2018, we would need to hold regular project meetings in order to read through all of the poems that we have collected. We would need to agree on the final selection of poems for the booklet. We would then need to to select an appropriate evacuation image to accompany each poem and choose an image for the front cover. We would then write some introductory text for the booklet , including some information on our community group and our thanks to the Aviva Community Fund. We would end the booklet with a 'further reading' section for those who wish to learn more about wartime evacuation.

Once the final copy is ready, we would obtain quotes from local printers and have between 50 and 100 booklets printed, to be distributed to schools and libraries in the Stockport MBC area. Later, and health permitting at the time, our evacuees could visit some of these libraries to read evacuation poems and share their own memories in person. Until we actually complete the booklet, we are unable to ascertain exactly what the printing costs would be.

We anticipate that our costs would include:-
Venue hire for monthly meetings
Refreshments at these meetings
Travel costs for the evacuees to attend these meetings, most of whom have mobility issues

Photocopy costs relating to the poems that we already possess. The poems would need to be printed out, in large print, so that those with impaired vision can read them easily at our meetings.

Postage costs as we will need to contact evacuees to obtain their permission to use their poetry and images in our booklet.
Stationery costs
Printing costs
Postage costs to send the booklets to libraries and schools with a covering letter
Travel costs for evacuees to visit one or two local libraries to share personal evacuation stories and poetry

The award of the Aviva funding in 2015 really helped cement the members of our community group together. They have formed firm friendships with other members and their families. At least half of our members have failing health. An opportunity to come together more regularly and to work together on this project would continue this bonding process and would also give our elderly evacuees something to aim for over the next year or so.

To offer your votes in support of the project, please visit https://www.avivacommunityfund.co.uk/voting/project/view/17-423 and register to offer your votes.

Good luck Gillian!

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

MyHeritage adds New York Immigration 1820-1957 records

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

MyHeritage Adds Significant Collection of New York Immigration Records with Unique Content

90 million records from the Ellis Island and Other New York Passenger Lists collection bring to light the stories of millions of immigrations, arrivals and visits to America spanning 138 years

TEL AVIV, Israel & LEHI, Utah, November 2, 2017 – MyHeritage, the leading international family history and DNA company, announced today the addition of the Ellis Island and Other New York Passenger Lists 1820-1957 collection to SuperSearch™, the company’s global search engine containing more than 8.25 billion historical records. The records are of major significance for anyone looking to trace their immigrant ancestors’ arrival in America, and include names, dates, countries of origin, addresses of family members and friends, occupations, and physical descriptions, among many other details.

The passenger manifests are an unparalleled source of information spanning key years of immigration from all over the world, including those entering the United States as refugees during the First and Second World Wars. The records include millions of entries via Ellis Island, which opened its doors on January 1, 1892. The first 72 years of the collection pre-date Ellis Island; Prior to the establishment of Ellis Island, the primary immigration station in New York City was Castle Garden, which opened in 1855, and before then, immigrants were received at several piers across the city. Towards the end of the timeframe, in the 1940s and 1950s, advancements in transportation methods are noticeable as records begin to include those who arrived via airplane to various airports in and around the city. The plethora of information in the records is expected to invigorate family histories, adding previously unknown stories
of how family members uprooted their lives, and replanted them in the United States.

As of 1897, immigration officials began asking those entering the United States for the name and address of the relative or friend whom they are joining in the USA, and in 1907 they began asking for the name and address of their closest relative or friend in their home country. The responses to these supplemental questions, that have been filled in the passenger manifests, have now been indexed by MyHeritage for the very first time, yielding an additional 26.6 million names in the Ellis Island and Other New York Passenger Lists collection on MyHeritage. These passenger manifests have been digitized by other organizations in the past, but the answers to these vital supplemental questions have never been indexed — until now. Furthermore, many of the passenger manifests span two pages, and a common omission for genealogists has been to locate the first page and miss the existence of the second. MyHeritage has solved this problem for the first time by stitching the double pages into single document images, ensuring that users do not miss information again.

Many historical figures of interest are found among these records, including Albert Einstein (who arrived in the US on October 17, 1933), former U.S. Secretary of State Madeline Albright (arrived November 11, 1948) and Charlie Chaplin (arrived October 1912). Composer and songwriter Irving Berlin who moved to the U.S. in 1903, appears on several manifests arriving from different places in Europe.

Users with family trees on MyHeritage will immediately benefit from Record Matching technology that automatically reveals new information about their ancestors who appear in these records.

“The Ellis Island and Other New York Passenger Lists 1820-1957 collection is a major asset on MyHeritage is a major asset for family history enthusiasts,” said Russ Wilding, Chief Content Officer at MyHeritage. “When we digitized this collection we employed out-of-the-box thinking to cover important aspects that were overlooked by others in the past. This makes this collection on MyHeritage the most complete and useful of its kind.”

MyHeritage is working to add additional immigration records into the collection from other port cities from around the United States, as well as several important Canadian border crossings, in the near future.

Searching the Ellis Island and Other New York Passenger Lists collection is free. A subscription is required to view records and scanned images and to access Record Matches.

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Surrey and New York collections join FindmyPast

This week's new FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) additions:

Surrey Lay Subsidies 1524-1645
Search for your ancestors in over 16,000 early taxation records created from The National Archives' E 179 series, 'Exchequer: King's Remembrancer: Particulars of account and other records relating to lay and clerical taxation, National treasury records'. Lay subsidies are taxation records from the final years of the Tudor period and the early years of the Jacobean era. All the records come from Surrey in South East England.

Surrey Court Cases 1391-1835
Surrey Court Cases is an index of over 26,000 records covering four centuries of Surrey court cases. Each record consists of a transcript that will reveal the year of the case, the court it was head at and, in some cases, full texts comprising the names of others named in the court proceedings.
The records cover four Surrey Courts:
  • Surrey Court of Star Chamber, 1485-1649 –dealt primarily with criminal cases and alleged violence such as sedition, illegal hunting, assault, fraud, public disorder, murder, and witchcraft.
  • Surrey Exchequer Court, 1497-1835 – responsible for cases of equity and revenue. You will find land disputes, titles of land, manorial rights, tithes, debts, and wills in these records.
  • Surrey Court of Requests, 1500-1624 – Due to the low cost and the speedy process of the Court of Requests, it was frequently used by the poor and servants of the king in matters of equity.
  • Surrey Court of Chancery, 1391-1758 – also dealt with cases of equity, trusts, and land laws, as well as the estates of lunatics and guardianship of infants

Surrey & South London Wills & Probate Index, 1470-1856
Just under 2,000 records have been added to our collection of Surrey & South London Will Abstracts 1470-1856. The index consists of names taken from original will registers held at the London Metropolitan Archives. The registers contain the details taken down from office copies of the wills as the testator or their solicitor would have retained the original document.

New York State Death Index Browse
Browse 71 indices of deaths from the state of New York. Images are broken up by year and cover the years 1880 to 1955. Records will reveal where your ancestor died, their date of death, cause of death, age at death and certificate number.

New York City Marriage Announcements, 1833-1836
This collection of marriage announcements from New York City contains many notices from newspapers not readily available to the public. The two newspapers included are The Sun and the New York Transcript. This work has two main indexes: the Groom and the Bride. Each record contains the names of both the bride and groom, the name of the officiating minister, the marriage date, location and the newspaper the notice was
originally printed in. The collection is also available to browse.

New York State Religious Records 1716-1914 Image Browse
Browse 120 volumes of baptisms, marriages, and deaths from dozens of New York State churches of various denominations.

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record
Another fascinating resource from NYG&B, The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record is the second oldest genealogical journal in the US and details the people and places of the Empire State from the 17th century onwards. We've added a further 85 images from Vol 148 No 3 in this latest update.

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-november-3rd-2505574686.html
Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Fife criminal and electoral records added to Ancestry

Two collections concerning the county of Fife have been added to Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

Fife, Scotland, Electoral Registers, 1914-1966
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61432
Source: Fife Electoral Registers, Fife Library and Archives Service, Fife, Scotland

About Fife, Scotland, Electoral Registers, 1914-1966

This database contains yearly registers listing names and residences of people in Fife, Scotland, who were eligible to vote in elections. These year-by-year registers can help place your ancestors in a particular place and possibly also reveal a bit about property they owned.

Please note that coverage for these burghs is incomplete:

Kilrenny, Anstruther Easter and Anstruther Wester Burgh, 1939 and from 1950 onwards
Royal Burgh of Burntisland 1934 and from 1950 onwards
Royal Burgh of Crail, 1939 and from 1950 onwards
Royal Burgh of Culross, 1934-1937 and from 1950 onwards
City and Royal Burgh of Dunfermline from 1958 onwards
Royal Burgh of Inverkeithing from 1950 onwards
Royal Burgh of Kinghorn from 1950 onwards
Royal Burgh of Kirkcaldy from 1956 onwards
Burgh of Lochgelly 1914 and from 1950 onwards
Royal Burgh of Pittenweem- 1939, and from 1950 onwards
Royal Burgh of St Andrews 1918,1932-1939, and from 1950 onwards


Fife, Scotland, Criminal Registers, 1910-1931
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61426
Source: Fife Criminal Registers, Fife Library and Archives Services, Fife, Scotland.

For each individual found within the report, you may be able to find (where available):

Name
Age at time of incarceration
Birth Place
The Nature of the Crime
Conviction Date
Conviction Place
Sentence
A photograph of the individual and/or a Physical Description


Also released are student records from London, England:

UK, University of London Student Records, 1836-1945
https://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=61488
Source: The University of London Archive

Further information on the collection is available via the stated link. Note that "During the 19th and early 20th centuries, students who attended other institutions took University of London examinations as external students. Included in these lists, therefore, are students who attended the predecessor institutions of universities such as Birmingham, Bristol, Durham, Dundee, Heriot-Watt, Southampton, Exeter, Newcastle, Nottingham, Manchester, Sheffield, Cardiff, Leeds, Liverpool, Bangor, Aberystwyth, Surrey, Queen’s University Belfast, and University College Dublin."

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Tuesday, 31 October 2017

Ancestry updates DNA platform ethnicity presentation

From Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

Your DNA story
From today, AncestryDNA results look slightly different. We’ve combined the ethnicity estimate with the sub-regions previously called ‘Communities’, to create one powerful view of your family’s origins.

Sub-regions are now listed under ethnicity regions – for example ‘Devon & Cornwall’ or ‘Wales & West Midlands’ under Great Britain. Some people will also see Migrations listed – for example, if you have family that travelled to the United States, you might see ‘Settlers of Northern Arkansas’. You can then learn more about how you’re connected to each group, and track your story over time.

TIPS AND TOOLS

Timeline
AncestryDNA results now also include a timeline, revealing the key events that may have affected different parts of your family – and showing the people in your tree who were around at the time.

For more on AncestryDNA visit www.ancestry.co.uk/dna

COMMENT: So this is my new ethnicity map:



The break down is slightly confusing. When I click on the tabs showing me to be 52% Ireland/Scotland/Wales, 24% Great Britain and 18% Europe West, all of them basically tell me that my DNA has ancestry from those regions but that I am specifically linked to Scotland.




I think it is telling me that the non-indigenous percentages are likely part of my Scottish DNA make-up as derived further back in time from immigrant ancestry. Could now be the time when I 'trade in my lederhosen for a kilt'...?!
 
Interestingly the Scotland group tags in Nova Scotia in Canada within its reference population.

I'll have to get my head around what this is all actually trying to tell me - it's time to dig out Blaine Bettinger's book, and to get properly stuck into Ancestry's own help guide on all of this...!

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Monday, 30 October 2017

Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts soon

My next 5 week lonScotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course starts on November 6th 2017 through Pharos Teaching and Tutoring Ltd. Here's a description of the course:

This is an intermediate level course in Scottish family history for those who are going back beyond 1850. You should have some experience with research in the Old Parochial Registers of the Church of Scotland and in using major websites for Scottish research. This course discusses sources that fill the gap when the OPRs are uninformative or missing; for example, records of parish and town administration, occupations, land transfer and taxation. Using these records involves several different locations. You will learn how to check online finding aids and how to find the most effective way to obtain records that may be online, in print, on CD or microfilm. This is the second course on Scottish research. If you have not taken Scottish Research Online please check its description.

Lesson Headings:

* Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
* Burgh records and town poor
* Occupations, taxation and early lists
* Land transfer and the value of sasines
* Land, inheritance and estates

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat session per week. See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: well structured chats with opportunities for questions as well

Relevant Countries: Scotland
Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 06 Nov 2017
Cost: £49.99


The following video gives a bit more of a flavour about what to expect:



(Also available at https://youtu.be/1vX6GZtwZJ0)

For further details, and to sign up, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Ghostbusting in Inveraray

In late 2009 I was invited to go on a ghosthunting event at Inveraray Jail in Argyll by a tour operator. I wrote up my escapades for two magazines, a short piece for Scottish Memories, and a longer piece for Discover my Past Scotland. As we get closer to Hallowe'en, here's the article from DMPS (with a couple of links updated) - enjoy!

Ghostbusting in Inveraray

Chris Paton goes in search of the paranormal at a 19th century jail…

A few years ago a discussion was aired in British genealogical magazines about whether the use of mediums was a valid tool for family history research. Personally speaking, I don’t believe in ghosts at all and am a complete sceptic, so have never paid attention to any of this in a professional capacity.

I should add, though, that this actually flies in the face of family tradition! In my mother’s paternal ancestry, the Grahams were members of a spiritualist church on Belfast’s Shankill Road. My two times great grandfather, Edwin Graham (see pic on right - he's on the back row at the right), was in fact the secretary of the Ulster Christian Spiritualists Society and rather dramatically made the newspapers across the UK in 1926 when he organised an experiment in Belfast City Cemetery to photograph a funeral, inviting well over a hundred spiritualists to bring their cameras along to take photographs as the deceased was lowered into the ground. Edwin believed that it might have been possible to capture images of other spirits in attendance, and a press report later claimed that he had been convinced that he had seen the ghost of his brother at the graveside. I have no doubt Edwin must have seen a spirit of some kind on that day, though whether we are taking the floaty, spooky kind is in my mind very open to question.

Nevertheless, having said all of that, I dearly want to believe that there is something true about the paranormal. After all, wouldn’t life be just ever so much more exciting? My wife Claire and I regularly watched the television series “Most Haunted”, myself as an enthusiastic sceptic – how did they do that, what could have caused that noise? – and my wife with a view that there could be more to it than meets the eye. So it was with a great deal of enthusiasm that we recently took up an invitation from Ghost Events Scotland (www.ghostevents.co.uk) to attend one of its ghost hunting vigils at Inveraray Castle.

Coincidentally, “Most Haunted” had actually visited both Inveraray Jail and the town’s nearby castle just a few weeks prior to our invitation, recording all sorts of apparent poltergeists and spooks. The Ghost Events Scotland night would be a similar sort of endeavour, with séances, Ouija boards, and a friendly medium to guide us around. Would things truly go bump in the night - or would we just keep bumping into things?


Inveraray Jail

Located on the shores of Loch Fyne in the heart of Campbell country, Inveraray Jail was first opened for business in 1820 as a prison of eight cells, where both male and female criminals, and debtors, could be locked up after a trial in the adjacent courtroom. A new prison block with a further twelve cells was opened in 1848, and the whole operation continued until 1889 when it was finally closed. Having been to the prison several times before, it was never hard to imagine the horrendous lives of the prisoners who resided there. From a genealogical point of view, the museum also provides many useful resources for family historians, not least of which is its online database of prisoners located at http://www.inverarayjail.co.uk/our-history/, providing information on those convicted, their crimes and in some cases details of transportation, though it does not provide case notes for any of those said to still be haunting the place! Prisoners faced a gruesome time within, having limited facilities, poor food, a small courtyard for exercise, and the occasional whipping with the birch.

Arriving at the Jail at 10.00pm on the Saturday evening of the event, we were hastily gathered into a room for a briefing on the forthcoming six hour vigil, which initially started with some ‘training’. This was in the form of acquiring ‘protection’ against any prospective baddies out to get us through the vigil, mainly by imagining some sort of white light around us – an interesting start, I thought. We were divided into two teams, and our team, led by a lady called Linda claiming to be a medium, was soon being escorted to the prison’s new block.

Once inside, with all the lights switched off, Linda apparently began to sense the spirits of a John and Hugh Campbell pacing up and down their cell. They seemed fairly quiet to me, so instead I began to wonder what life must have been like each night for the prisoners, particularly in the winter with its short daylight hours. It was minus eight degrees outside, and not much warmer inside. As we left the ground floor, Linda announced that we were now being followed by a violent sheep stealer called Robert Stewart. Not one for having my sheep stolen, I quickly moved upstairs with everybody else. (In fact, a consultation of the database after the event did reveal that a person of that name from Glencoe was imprisoned in 1855 for 15 months for sheep stealing from three farms.)

In an upstairs room, we were then asked to try to talk to spirits using a Ouija board. People get awfully spooked by Ouija boards, but not being a believer in the paranormal, I did not worry about having a go! I duly stuck my finger firmly on the glass, and after several minutes I was soon receiving the message loudly and clearly that my finger was getting very cold, but nothing more. Clearly 19th century prison discipline must have worked, because none of the spirits there were attempting to say boo to a goose.

But what about the notorious cell ten? A malevolent spirit was said to physically throw people from the single hammock fixed to its walls. We were all asked to squeeze in and a volunteer was asked for to lie on the bed. Too good an opportunity to put my feet up for a few minutes, I duly volunteered. I was surprised at how comfortable the bunk actually was, but sadly surprised by nothing more. I have to concede though that there is something distinctly surreal about lying on a bunk with ten people standing around you in the pitch black waiting for you to be violently attacked.

After swapping Linda for the organiser’s parapsychologist, we then proceeded to do an ‘EVP’ experiment. This involved asking three questions into a voice recorder, and leaving gaps in between. Once played back, some weird noises did emerge in the gaps. Some believed that these were spirits trying to break through, but I was not at all convinced.

The final event of the night, once again with Linda, was a visit to the court room. In total darkness we had to perform a role play, apparently seeing a trial underway may have excited spirits to come out and play! So rather bizarrely I suddenly found myself as the judge, standing beside the mannequin of the museum’s judge, sentencing some poor wee woman I had never met before in our team for having stolen her neighbour’s dog (I should add that no animals were harmed in the making of this production!). A séance was then held in the middle of the room. As one of the party excitedly yelled out “I challenge you in the name of God, and even he who cannot be named, to show yourself!”, my wife, a big fan of the Harry Potter books, looked to me and said “Who, Voldemort?”

So was it worth the visit? For me, nothing spooky happened, and as my wife put it, she went in a believer and came out a sceptic. But it was most definitely worth it to be allowed a free run around the museum and to experience it in a way that one normally cannot get the chance to. It was also a lot of fun. Would I go again? Definitely! And those ghosts know that this arrogant, sceptical genealogist has yet to be broken - they have as yet got everything to play for...!

UPDATE: Here's that Most Haunted episode in Inveraray - boo!



Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Sunday, 29 October 2017

Review: Tracing Your Dublin Ancestors (4th ed)

(Having just gone through an exceptionally busy period, much of it overseas, this review is a little late in coming, but the book is certainly worth a plug!)

Tracing Your Dublin Ancestors (4th edition)
James G. Ryan and Brian Smith

Although this is a fourth and revised edition of the popular title, this is the first edition I have actually read - and a handy guide it will certainly turn out to be when I go chasing my three times great grandmother Teresa Mooney from Dublin City! The book deals with both the nation's capital city and the wider county of the same name.

The book is broken down into thirteen chapters. The first provides a basic introduction, followed by a very useful section on administrative divisions, including a handy list of Dublin county civil parishes (with the years in which Griffiths Valuation and the tithes were published/recorded) and relevant maps.

Chapters 3-10 deal with record types.  Civil registration, censuses and census substitutes (from 1468), church records, directories, probate material, gravestone inscriptions, newspapers and land records. The section on church records, and where to find them, is worth the price of the book purchase alone - with detailed descriptions of holdings for every denomination, with links on where to find some availability online.

The chapter on gravestone inscriptions is limited to published resources on inscriptions only, and appears to overlook some major online offerings on burials, not least Glasnevin Cemetery's online database (www.glasnevintrust.ie/genealogy), and the Irish Genealogy Project Archives (www.igp-web.com/IGPArchives/ire/dublin/index.htm), which has superb photographic records of headstones in cemeteries such as Mount Jerome.

The land records chapter has some useful details on where to find estate papers of some key Dublin families, whilst Chapters 11 and 12 detail some published family histories, and further reading resources. The final chapter rounds of the book with some useful library, archive and society addresses.

Overall this book provides a real eye-opener for researchers as to the wealth of material that is not available online, as well as online, with useful contextual explanations as to what the records are. A superb contribution to available handbooks on Irish research, and an absolute essential for those like me with Dublin ancestry.

Tracing Your Dublin Ancestors (4th edition) is available from Flyleaf Press at www.ancestornetwork.ie/flyleaf/book/Tracing-your-Dublin-Ancestors

Price: €13.00
The following prices include postage: 
£14.00 to UK; $22 to US; CAD$23 to Canada

(With thanks to James Ryan for the review copy)

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Irish Newspaper Archive discounts for Hallowe'en

The Irish Newspaper Archive (www.irishnewsarchive.com) has several codes available for discounted subscriptions, as a Hallowe'en treat:


 
Subscribe at https://www.irishnewsarchive.com/subscribe - this offer is valid until Tuesday 31.Oct.2017

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Friday, 27 October 2017

Portsmouth records and the Carrickfergus Advertiser join FindmyPast

New records from FindmyPast (www.findmypast.com):

Hampshire, Portsmouth Baptisms
Did your ancestor's baptism take place in the UK's only Island City? Search over 555,000 original Portsmouth Parish Baptisms to find out. Published online for the first time in association with the Portsmouth History Centre, the Portsmouth parish registers date back to the early 16th century and pertain to Church of England parishes in the deaneries of Portsmouth, Gosport, Fareham, and Havant.

Hampshire, Portsmouth Marriages
Add another branch to your family tree by uncovering the details of your Portsmouth ancestor's spouse with over 379,000 parish marriage records covering the deaneries of Portsmouth, Gosport, Fareham, and Havant. Search transcripts of these original parish registers to discover when your ancestor married, where they were married and the name of their spouse. Records will also reveal the couples' birth years, residences, occupations, marital statuses, marriage type (banns or license), the names of both their and fathers and their father's occupations.

Hampshire, Portsmouth Burials
Discover the final resting place of your Portsmouth ancestors with over 312,000 brand new parish burials. The records span from the 16th century to present day; however, due to privacy concerns, there is a 100-year cut-off on publishing parish records.

Hampshire, Portsmouth Parish Registers Browse
Browse through 873 volumes of original parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials held at Portsmouth History Centre. These records pertain to Church of England parishes in the deaneries of Portsmouth, Gosport, Fareham, and Havant. The majority of these registers pertain to Anglican records, but there are a few that relate to other denominations: Congregational, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, Unitarian, United Methodist, and Wesleyan Methodist. All denominations were required to register life events with the established church until 1837.

Hampshire, Portsmouth Workhouse Registers
Were your ancestors admitted to the workhouse on Portsea Island? Explore over 60,000 admission and discharge registers spanning the years 1879 to 1953 and uncover details of the relief they received. Portsmouth's workhouse was built in 1725 and by 1777 housed up to 200 inmates.

Irish Newspapers
More than 101,000 records and one brand new title, the Carrickfergus Advertiser have been added to our collection of historical Irish Newspapers this month. The Advertiser currently contains over 1,300 issues spanning the years 1884 to 1919 and will be updated further in the future.

Further details at https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/findmypast-friday-2501895877.html

COMMENT: Coming from Carrickfergus myself, the Carrick Ad is a paper I know only too well - I used to deliver it on my paper run as a kid!

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

National Library of Wales broadcast archive survey

The National Library of Wales (https://www.llgc.org.uk/) has an online survey for interested users to fill out concerning a proposed Broadcast Archive. From the Survey:

The National Library of Wales Broadcast Archive is a brand new ambitious project at the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth!

With financial support from the HLF, we’re receiving BBC Cymru/Wales sound and video recordings to add to our collections. So, that’s all of the original recordings and their digital copies, which will be added to the ITV Wales film and video archive already kept at the Library

We will be:
preserving the collections for ever by keeping them safe in a brand new storage area making it digitally available for the public to view

All of the material will be available to view in 4 digital viewing hubs that we will be opening in Aberystwyth, Wrexham, Carmarthen and Cardiff and 1000 clips will be available to view online on our website.

The collection is unique in that it records all aspects of life in 20th century Wales. It includes radio recordings from the 1930s and television from the 1950s and with over 360,000 sound and video items to choose from the programmes are as varied as life is in Wales!

Maybe you will discover a clip of your favourite rugby game, news of an event you remember, an exciting episode of your favourite soap opera, a piece of comedy that makes you laugh until your sides hurt, your favourite pop star or a children's programme that reminds you of your childhood ... or even maybe a clip of your grandparents ...

And there are sports programmes, news, documentaries, soaps, dramas, comedy, music and children’s television ….. And so much more ….. The programmes are as varied as life is in Wales …..

We really want to develop a project that you will love and so we need to know what you want us to do!

Help us at the National Library to plan and develop a project for you by taking five minutes to answer this questionnaire!

The survey is available online at http://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/SQ3RL/

Chris

My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.

Thursday, 26 October 2017

Forthcoming FamilySearch webinars and classes

The following classes and webinars will be hosted online by FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org) in November:

Thursday, November 2, 11:00 a.m., Exploring Death Notices in Norway (Beginner)
Saturday, November 4 , 1:00 p.m., Árbol Familiar para principiantes (Beginner)
Monday, November 6, 10:00 a.m., Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner)
Monday, November 6, 11:00 a.m., Exploring Emigration Records in Norway—Finding Place of Origin (Beginner)
Monday, November 6, 1:00 p.m., Beginning Swiss Research (Beginner)
Tuesday, November 7, 10:00 a.m., Overview of FamilySearch (Beginner)
Thursday November 9, 9:00 a.m., Immigration and Canadian Border Crossing (Beginner)
Thursday, November 9, 11:00 a.m., Swiss Census Records (Beginner)
Thursday, November 9, 12:30 p.m., French Language Indexing (1½ hours) (Beginner)
Thursday, November 9, 12:30 p.m., Italian Language Indexing (1½ hours) (Beginner)
Thursday, November 9, 1:00 p.m., Reivers and Relatives: Ancestors Along the Anglo-Scottish Border (Intermediate)
Thursday, November 9, 2:30 p.m., Portuguese Language Indexing (1½ hours) (Beginner)
Thursday, November 9, 2:30 p.m., Spanish Language Indexing (1½ hours) (Beginner)
Thursday, November 9, 4:30 p.m.,Web Indexing Training (1½ hours) (Beginner)
Thursday, November 9, 6:30 p.m., Leadership Indexing Training (1½ hours) (Beginner)
Monday, November 13, 10:00 a.m.,Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner)
Tuesday, November 14, 10:00 a.m., Starting FamilyTree: Navigating, Adding, Standardizing and Printing (Beginner)
Tuesday, November 14, 1:00 p.m., England Case Study and Research Strategy (Intermediate)
Wednesday, November 15, 10:00 a.m., Dutch Language Indexing (1½ hours) (Beginner)
Thursday, November 16, 11:00 a.m.,United States Census Records (Beginner)
Thursday, November 16, 1:00 p.m., Lost in London! Tracing Elusive Ancestry in London and Other Big Cities (Intermediate)
Saturday, November 18, 1:00 p.m., Getting Started in Mexico? Why You Should Try Ancestry.com (Beginner)
Monday, November 20, 10:00 a.m., Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner)
Tuesday, November 21, 10:00 a.m., Staring Family Tree: Preserving Memories Using Photos and Documents (Beginner)
Wednesday, November 29, 10:00 a.m., Web Indexing Training (1½ hours) (Beginner)

Further details, and how to sign up, at http://media.familysearch.org/free-family-history-library-classes-and-webinars-for-november-2017/

Chris


My next 5 week long Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs course commences Nov 6th 2017 - details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.