Wednesday, 23 April 2014

PRONI - Using Church Records lecture on YouTube

A big thanks to PRONI for helping me to resolve something that has bugged me for a few years! The archive has placed online a lecture by Valerie Adams of the Presbyterian Historical Society of Ireland, entitled Using Church Records, and divided up into four segments. Here's the first:



Also directly available on YouTube at http://youtu.be/K-0_pihTPO0

Links for the rest are:
Part 2 http://youtu.be/5wYHJPrUup4
Part 3 http://youtu.be/u0WQi2t4rhM
Part 4 http://youtu.be/0CRXTcjTbP0

The question that bugged me was about Ireland's state church records, those of the Anglican based Church of Ireland. If the church's hierarchy was Anglican, why were there not bishops transcripts kept at the diocesan level, as in England and Wales? Well, it it turns out that there were - but they were also destroyed in the Four Courts fire in 1922, with just a few fragments surviving. It's a small thing, but wee questions like that bug the hell out of me if I can't get an answer - so that's another one to tick off the list...!

The PRONI You Tube channel also has a copy of a lecture by Dr. Annaleigh Margey of Dundalk Institute of Technology on The 1641 Depositions- an early source for local history (and beyond), available via http://www.proni.gov.uk/index/search_the_archives/proni-on-youtube.htm

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

Scottish Genealogy Club forum launches

A new discussion forum has been set up for Scottish family history called the Scottish Genealogy Club, located at http://scottishgenealogyclub.org.uk.

It is totally free to join, and simply requires registration, though some paid for look up services are available (the site does describe itself as not for profit). The site's aims are at http://scottishgenealogyclub.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=3



Other forums dedicated to Scottish ancestral research include Talking Scot (www.talkingscot.com), ScotFamTree (http://scotfamtree.b1.jcink.com) and the Scottish component of Rootschat (www.rootschat.co.uk).

(With thanks to the SGC)

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

TNA podcast - The Post Office Tower

The latest podcast from the National Archives in Kew is entitled The Post Office Tower: symbol of a new Britain?, a twenty minute talk from Mark Dunton about the construction of the tower in 1965 in London. It can be listened to directly at http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/post-office-tower/ or downloaded for free from iTunes.

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

Nottinghamshire Archives refurbishment

Forwarded by the Federation of Family History Societies (www.ffhs.org.uk):

Nottinghamshire Archives is pleased to announce that work to extend the strong rooms and refurbish the public areas will commence on 31st March 2014.

We will endeavour to keep any disruption to a minimum; however, there may be times when selected collections are temporarily unavailable. On 20th October the service will close for approximately three months.

Important dates

31st March 2014 Building work commences. From this date no car parking facilities will be available.

20th October 2014 Service closures for refurbishment of public and staff areas

Early February 2015 service reopens (with no car park)

Late March 2015 – car park becomes available

May 2015 – official reopening


Why are we doing this?

Once the works are completed we will have:
· secured enough storage to acquire historical documents for the next 20 years
· a new storage area with improved standards of security, fire, flood and environmental control
· provided two meeting rooms, with one on the ground floor
· improved visitor facilities
· modernised the service offer
Regards

Ruth Imeson
Team Manager Archives and Local Studies
Nottinghamshire County Council
ruth.imeson@nottscc.gov.uk
www.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/archives

(With thanks to Beryl Evans)

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

Tuesday, 22 April 2014

FindmyPast - the How To video

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) has created a short video to try to explain the features of the new version of the site, a radically changed beast which has alienated many long term users. It can be accessed here:



(Also on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOEi_nLLkRw)

The first minute is wasted restating the FindmyPast corporate line on just why this is so good and why the changes had to be done, after which there is then a walk through of some features - you may need to watch this a couple of times, it goes quite fast. Narrator Myko Clelland ends almost apologetically explaining that "new FindmyPast is very different but it is the same old friend" and states that the firm is "proud to be part of this passionate genealogy community".

Changes are being applied to the site to try to make it more fit for purpose, but I suspect there is still a hell of a long way to go to regain the trust of users. I've just checked, and my own personal bugbear remains what the company has done in terms of the source citations that have now been placed online for the Scottish censuses, which - not to put too fine a point on it - are basically utter crap, meaningless and completely unfit for purpose (see my recent post at http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/findmypast-scottish-censuses.html). Are there actually any genealogists advising on these things at FMP Towers?

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

Recent parish records updates at TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk) has recently added to its parish records collections for England and Wales.

29,000 additional baptisms from Worcestershire have been uploaded (in partnership with Malvern Family History Society), covering 1544-1891, and additional records for Essex ( 388,100 records), Kent (167,222 records), Leicestershire (2,365 records) and Monmouthshire (1,226 records).

A full lost of parish holdings on the site is accessible at
http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/nameindex/ai_content.php?show_cat=9#includes

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

Mortonhall Crematorium report given to Edinburgh City Council

There's been a bit of a local scandal here in Scotland concerning Mortonhall Crematorium in Edinburgh, and the disposal of babies cremated remains without their bereaved parents' knowledge. The BBC has the story at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-27118451.

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

Friday, 18 April 2014

Next of Kin WW1 exhibition starts in Edinburgh

The National War Museum in Edinburgh is hosting an exhibition entitled Next of Kin from today until March 2015, after which it will tour around Scotland until 1917, visiting eight venues - these are Dumfries Museum, Rozelle House (Ayr), Hawick Museum, Low Parks Museum (South Lanarkshire), Inverness Museum and Art Gallery, Perth Museum and Art Gallery, Grampian Transport Museum (Aberdeenshire) and Orkney Museum. For details on the exhibition visit https://www.nms.ac.uk/our_museums/war_museum/next_of_kin.aspx.

The BBC has an article showing some of the exhibits at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-27021381.

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

Surnames database project reaches 45,000 names

The Family Names of the United Kingdom Project, currently under way at my old university in Bristol, the University of the West of England, has now researched some 45,000 names to date in its project to document British surnames across time, completing the first phase of the project due to be published in 2016.

The project was recently revised and given additional funding to include surnames for which there are still at least 20 people bearing it as a minimum, as opposed to the previous 100.

The full update is available at both www.medievalists.net/2014/04/14/database-uk-surnames-reached-45000-entries-dating-back-middle-ages/ and www1.uwe.ac.uk/cahe/research/bristolcentreforlinguistics/fanuk.aspx.

(With thanks to Medievalists.net)

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.

SAFHS conference 2014

A quick reminder that the Scottish Association of Family History Societies (SAFHS) is holding its 25th annual conference next Saturday 26th April in Dunfermline - full details are accessible at www.safhs.org.uk/silver.asp, and the conference booking form at www.safhs.org.uk/images/2014/delegate.pdf.

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians. And for those wishing to take Scottish ancestral research a bit further, my next Pharos course, Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Records, commences May 14th 2014.