Wednesday, 20 August 2014

Scottish Genealogy Network members at WDYTYA Live Glasgow

If you are planning on attending Who Do You Think You Are? Live (www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com) in Glasgow, and you work as a professional genealogist within Scotland, please ask anyone wearing these badges at the event about what the Scottish Genealogy Network can offer by way of support and help.


There are no membership fees, we're an informal self-help networking body that meets once a month at a different venue across Scotland to discuss issues of relevance to our industry, to pool ideas for problems which may be encountered in research, and which organises its own programme of CPD events twice a year here in Scotland. And we're a friendly bunch :) For an idea of the sorts of activities we get up to, please visit our dedicated blog site at http://scottishgenealogynetwork.blogspot.co.uk.

If you don't work as a genie, many of our members will be participating in the Society of Genealogists' Ask the Experts area (I'll be doing my own stint there each day from 3-4pm). Book a twenty minute slot to discuss any genealogical issues you wish to work through, and we'll do our best to help!

See you there!

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

Monday, 18 August 2014

WDYTYA Live Glasgow announces vendors and exhibitors

Who Do You Think You Are Live has uploaded a list of the vendors who will be attending the show at the end of next week at the SECC in Glasgow. The list is accessible at http://www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com/about-show/our-exhibitors.

Amongst those exhibiting are Ancestry, the National Records of Scotland (with ScotlandsPeople), FamilySearch, the Universities of Strathclyde and Dundee, Deceased Online, and many others, including all the way from Australia, Unlock the Past, to promote both its genealogy books and genealogy cruises (I'll be helping on the stall!). Who Do You Think You Are magazine will also have a special edition to tie in with the event, including an article written by yours truly on how to start off with your research!

There is much more of a Scottish presence this year, with many archives and family history societies, but also some surprise omissions from the main UK vendors - for example, FindmyPast is not attending, nor the British Newspaper Archive, The Genealogist, nor even the National Archives from Kew. However, with a packed talks programme and a chance to talk with folk on many stands not normally exhibiting at the London event, this will be very similar and yet very different experience at the same time - and above all, a fun day out if you want to get stuck into your ancestral research!

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

Friday, 15 August 2014

DeceasedOnline adds two Hertfordshire cemeteries records

From Deceased Online (www.deceasedonline.com):

Hertfordshire burial records now 200,000+

Burial records for two more Hertfordshire, England cemeteries are now available on www.deceasedonline.com

The addition of Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council's Welwyn Hatfield Lawn and Hatfield Hyde cemeteries means that there are now 10 Herfordshire cemeteries' records exclusively available on Deceased Online.

The Hertfordshire records date back to 1801 and include over 200,000 records for 90,000+ individual names and burials.

The records comprise: Scans of original registers; grave details identifying all those buried in each grave; and cemetery section maps indicating the section location of each grave.

(NB: DeceasedOnline will be at WDYTYA Live in Glasgow)

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

Changes to UK copyright law and data-mining permissions

I've just received the following from Tahitia McCabe, who runs the Genealogical Studies Postgraduate Programme at the University of Strathclyde (www.strath.ac.uk/genealogy/), which she has very kindly given me permission to share with British GENES readers. It concerns recent changes in UK copyright law from 1 JUN 2014 which will be of interest to those who may wish to 'data mine' certain websites for genealogical purposes, for non-commercial activities only. Here is Tahitia's summary:

It allows researchers doing non-commercial work to data mine databases they have legal access to without the need to ask for permission and database providers cannot use tools such as imposing download speeds that would prevent researchers from benefiting from this exemption.

Here is the text from the attached guidance from the Intellectual Property Office:

The new copyright exception will allow researchers to make copies of any copyright material for the purpose of computational analysis if they already have the right to read the work (that is, work that they have “lawful access” to). They will be able to do this without having to obtain additional permission from the rights holder. This exception only permits the making of copies for the purpose of text and data mining for non-commercial research. Researchers will still have to buy subscriptions to access material; this could be from many sources including academic publishers.

Publishers and content providers will be able to apply reasonable measures to maintain their network security or stability but these measures should not prevent or unreasonably restrict researcher’s ability to text and data mine. Contract terms that stop researchers making copies to carry out text and data mining will be unenforceable.


Tahitia has also notified me that it is now also possible to legally make backups of digital items such as e-books - additional information is available from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/changes-to-copyright-law and at http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/news/breakthrough-copyright-law-reform-confirmed

(With thanks to Tahitia)

NB: If you wish to sign up for the University of Strathclyde's genealogical studies courses, the 3rd week of September is the latest time you will be able to do so. The university will also have a stand at the forthcoming Who Do You Think You Are Live event, where you can find them at tables 64 & 65.

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

1861 census book for Milton added to ScotlandsPeople

ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) has released a further 1861 Census enumeration book, for the Milton district in Glasgow, with 15 pages of entries not previously available. They have also updated the indexes for all census years on the site, correcting many errors to improve searchability.

The site has also added a new PDF download facility to allow for the download of multipage documents (such as testaments) as a single PDF document. To do so, use the 'Download as PDF' button at the top right of the image viewer.

(With thanks to ScotlandsPeople)

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

Wednesday, 13 August 2014

Ancestry hosts medical records from New South Wales

If your ancestors migrated to New South Wales in Australia, these medical records collections on Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) may be of interest:

New South Wales, Australia, Medical Registers, 1925-1954
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=8819

New South Wales, Australia, Hospital & Asylum Records, 1840-1913
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=8812

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

National Archives at Kew - user forum dates

The National Archives (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk) will be holding public user forum meetings on the following dates:

Wednesday 20 August 2014, 12:30-13:45
Thursday 16 October 2014, 12:30-13:45
Tuesday 18 November 2014, 17:30-18:45
Thursday 22 January 2015, 12:30-13:45
Tuesday 17 February 2015, 15:15-16:30

Full details are available at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/get-involved/user-forum.htm.

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

Tuesday, 12 August 2014

Meeting with the National Records of Scotland

Today I had a very productive two hour meeting in Glasgow with Anne Slater, Head of Public Services at the National Records of Scotland, to discuss my recent blog posts criticising the archive's current working practices, in particular from the perspective of working genealogists. I just want to say a huge thank you to British GENES readers who subsequently commented their experiences on those blog posts, to those who sent comments privately by email, and also to members of the Scottish Genealogy Network (www.scottishgenealogynetwork.blogspot.co.uk) who graciously contributed some of their experiences also. I was able to present a document to the NRS with many of these comments, which flagged up certain themes and issues which will be taken further for discussion. I would also like to sincerely thank Anne for her time in coming through to Glasgow for our conversation.

I can't really comment on the discussion we had as yet, other than to say that I did sense a very welcome will there for the archive to further engage with its user base. In the meantime, one bit of news that did emerge is that the NRS website at www.nrscotland.gov.uk, which has been hovering quite a bit in the background for a long while, is soon to be further developed, with the eventual aim of it replacing the two current sites for the NAS and the GROS (though these will continue to run in parallel for a while) with one single platform.

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

UK, Naval Officer and Rating Service Records, 1802-1912 on Ancestry

From Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

FIRST LOOK: SEARCH THESE NEW RECORDS BEFORE ANYONE ELSE
Be the first to enlist with new UK naval records

Does the sea run in your blood? Find out in UK Naval Officer and Rating Service Records, a detail-rich collection compiled for Royal Marines, Coastguards, Dockyard workers, Sea Fencibles, and Convict Guards.

This week’s special offer lets you search them first, before anyone else gets hold of them. This gives you a head start on your family research this summer and helps you find your seafaring ancestors.

The collection is fully titled UK, Naval Officer and Rating Service Records, 1802-1912 and is accessible at http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=9050

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks

Foundling Museum exhibition - The Generous Georgian

News of a major exhibition at the Foundling Museum in London (www.foundlingmuseum.org.uk):

The Generous Georgian: Dr Richard Mead
26 September 2014 -4 January 2015

The story of an eminent physician and patron of the arts who helped create the Foundling Hospital

For the last major exhibition of the Foundling Museum’s 10th anniversary year, the focus turns to the life and work of Dr Richard Mead (1673-1754), one of the most eminent physicians, patrons, collectors and philanthropists of his day, and a significant figure in the early history of the Foundling Hospital.

A leading expert on poisons, scurvy, smallpox and public health, Mead’s patients included Queen Anne, George II, Sir Isaac Newton and the painter Antoine Watteau. Mead was no stranger to daring acts and fierce controversies, with stories of drinking snake venom in his investigations into the effects of various poisons, and fighting a duel to defend his theory on smallpox treatment. He also possessed a deep-seated passion for the arts, demonstrated in a lifetime’s patronage of painters such as Allan Ramsay and a revered collection of masterpieces that included works by Dürer, Holbein, Rembrandt, Poussin and Canaletto.

Smallpox was endemic in Georgian England, and killed an estimated 400,000 Europeans throughout the eighteenth century. Though vaccination against smallpox was developed by Edward Jenner at the end of the century, inoculation was promoted decades earlier. Dr Mead was an ardent and effective advocate of this procedure, which saved the lives of many, including foundlings. Of the 247 children who were inoculated at the Foundling Hospital, by 1756 only one had died of the disease.

Exploring Mead’s diverse contributions to Georgian society - the collector, the philanthropist and the physician - this exhibition reunites key objects from Mead’s life and collection, such as the ancient bronze Arundel Head (2nd Century BC) and Allan Ramsay’s half-length portrait of Mead (above), evidence of his significance in London’s cultural landscape.

Items from the Foundling Museum archive, such as the minutes from the very first Governors’ meeting, and the logs of daily life at the Foundling Hospital in the first year, are also on display to illustrate Mead’s relationship with the Hospital and the important role he played in its early history. Mead dedicated considerable time and energy to the Hospital, encouraging his noble clients to support the charity, serving as a Governor and giving his clinical expertise pro bono. His contribution went even further, to attending sick children and advising on nurses’ salaries and what medicines to keep in stock.

Mead’s home on Great Ormond Street backed onto the Foundling Hospital grounds, and housed his magnificent collection of paintings, sculptures, antiquities, coins and a library of over 10,000 books. Painters and scholars were given access to Mead’s renowned collection which, in a time before public galleries, offered visitors a rare chance to view artistic masterpieces from around the world.

Mead’s generosity in every aspect of his life meant his family were burdened with huge debts following his death. Perhaps anticipating this, Mead’s will ordered for the sale of thousands of objects from his incredible collection - in an auction lasting 56 days! Through a number of key objects, we highlight a once-legendary collection which, compared to that of his contemporary and founder of the British Museum, Sir Hans Sloane, is not so well known today.

This exhibition celebrates the energy, learning and wide interests of a truly generous Georgian who, according to his contemporary the writer Samuel Johnson, “lived more in the broad sunshine of life than almost any man”.

The Generous Georgian: Dr Richard Mead is supported by the Wellcome Trust, the City of London Corporation, Royal College of Physicians and Verita.

(With thanks to the Foundling Museum)

Chris

Now available for UK research is the new second edition of the best selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, whilst my new book British and Irish Newspapers is also now out. And please consider purchasing the great new version of Caledonia by The Libations at 79p via www.caledonia2014.com - all profits go to help fund Scottish foodbanks